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Science
 

Absolute Zero And The Conquest Of Cold
by Tom Shachtman
For the serious student to the professor. Absolute zero is -235 degrees Celsius. Frozen foods; refrigeration; and utilizing the "science" of cold to enable industry to flourish in hot, humid climates are just a few of the conveniences we have due to people like: Boyle, Joule, William Thomson (later Lord Kelvin), and other lesser-knowns like Anders Celsius and Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit. This book is for everyone who loves history or science or who has ever sighed with pleasure on entering an air conditioned room.

$14.00


Anthropologist on Mars: Seven Paradoxical Tales
by Oliver W. Sacks
For the serious student to the professor. The works of neurologist Oliver Sacks have a special place in the swarm of mind-brain studies. He has done as much as anyone to make non-specialists aware of how much diversity gets lumped under the general heading of "the human mind." In seven amazing stories, Sacks, in his clear, human, introspective, and funny story-telling way, gives us reason to re-evaluate our view of mental disabilities. In a time when tolerance and diversity are political buzzwords, Oliver Sacks gives us concrete reasons to employ those words more usefully. "Oliver Sacks is the Carl Sagan or Stephen Jay Gould of his field; his books are true classics of medical writing on the breadth of human mentality, and the inner lives of the disabled."

$14.00.


Atom: A Single Oxygen Atom's Journey from the Big Bang to Life on Earth...and Beyond
by Lawrence Krauss
The author of the national bestseller The Physics of Star Trek traces the history of the cosmos by telling the story of a single oxygen atom-from the beginning of time to the present moment and deep into the future. Writing with grace and wit, Lawrence Krauss explicates cutting-edge science as he takes us on a thrilling, millennia-spanning journey that tells the truth of matter-what it is, where it came from, and where it's going.

$15.95


The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature
by Steven Pinker
I confess! I am a serious fan of Steven Pinker. He is logical and does not hesitate to follow wherever his conclusions lead him. "Notable is Pinker's calm, complete demolition, on strictly biological grounds, of the notion that an embryo is "ensouled" at the moment of conception." (Perhaps still more notable, and indicative of the book's even tenor for all its polemics, is his refusal to draw any pro-choice conclusion from that.) "It's a joy to see some of Pinker's more irrational targets, from die-hard Marxism to the rejection of science itself by "critical theory" to the bromide that rape isn't "about" sexual desire, skewered with such swift and classical neatness. The longer lasting pleasures will come from a leisurely unpacking and sifting of all his positive conjectures, conclusions, and insights." "It's a book you can zip through in a couple of nights, or return to for 'thought-fodder' for years."

$27.95


Boltzmann's Atom: The Great Debate that Launched a Revolution in Physics
by David Lindley
Being a pioneer has never been easy. In the 19th century, physicist Ludwig Boltzmann stirred up controversy by proposing that scientists could make intelligent guesses about the behavior of atoms, which, though they moved randomly, could be described by certain probabilistic generalizations. "To an audience of physicists raised in the belief that scientific laws ought to propound absolute certainties and unerring rules," writes David Lindley, "these were profound and disturbing changes." Bortzmann's work made possible the quantum revolution effected by Planck and Einstein.

$24.00


Chaos
by James Gleick
The author, a former science writer for the New York Times, writes about complicated, obscure subjects in a clear and engaging manner. This is not a purely technical book. It focuses on both the scientists studying chaos and on the subject of chaos itself. It relies on sketches, photographs, and Gleik's wonderful descriptive prose.

$18.95


Computers and the Imagination:Visual Adventures Beyond the Edge
by Clifford Pickover
An interactive exploration of how computer imagery relates to art, music, science, technology and human creativity. The author starts with a few chapters on the Top 10 Scientists and what would happen if an IBM computer was placed in the year 1900. He then goes on to talk about the applications of computer science on almost every science, with a few pages on every subject. His book is 63 chapters long - among them: "The World of Chaos, Twisted Mirror Worlds,The Moire Effect: Practical and Pictorial Patterns, and Visualization of the Gleichniszahlen-Reihe Monster." This is the book for every computer scientist who wants to enhance his/her creativity. Every page is packed with ideas for using the computer to visualize the world of mathematics, and lovingly illustrated with great pictures to show you that each equation is not just a dry, boring, thing, but a gateway into a new (2-, 3-, or N-dimensional!) universe. This isn't a book to teach programming, so you'll have to go elsewhere for that, but if you already have a basic understanding of your favorite programming language, and know how to draw graphics to the screen, this book will provide many, many ideas, when you get to the point of "what can I do next?" Highly recommended!

$19.95


Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain
by Antonio R. Damasio
If you believe that science has no power to shed light on thorny philosophical questions, read this book. Damasio makes a compelling case that modern studies of the brain and brain damage clearly demonstrate that the "mind" depends on complex interaction between brain and body and that emotion and rationality cannot be separated, indeed can't exist separately. This book is not an easy read, but it is compelling in its argument. This is that occasional book that has the power to make the reader see mankind's place in the world in a new light.

$13.50


Double Helix
by James Watson
Watson's chronicle gives readers an idea of what living science is like, warts and all. Not a "dry" read by any means.

$15.95


Einstein's Dreams
by Allen Lightman
At one time it was said that only 3 people understood Einstein's theory of relativity. Times have changed. Once the concept was "digested", scientific thought has gone on to further study of fascinating concepts about the universe. This book is a beautiful work of fiction that explores the nature of creativity.

$12.95


Einstein's Miraculous Year
by John J. Stachel
After 1905, Einstein's miraculous year, physics would never be the same again. Five great papers established him as the world's leading physicist. For the first time, this book brings those papers together in an accessible format with background information by Stachel.

$19.95


The Essential John Nash
by John Nash and Sylvia Nasar
"John Nash's creative work in game theory has had the most profound influence on both its mathematics and its practical applications in economics. In this book, his work in this area is joined with his other mathematical contributions in a single volume, to give a more rounded perspective." "These papers are among the most important original contributions to mathematics of the twentieth century. They have been extremely influential and their influence continues to grow." John Nash has attracted enormous popular interest over the past few years. In many ways, the notion of equilibrium in game theory that bears his name is the central concept in game theory, which has led to a revolution in the field of economics. This book, by bringing together Nash's work in game theory and in mathematics, will allow readers to appreciate the scope of his work."

$29.95


The Evolution Explosion: Hpw Humans Cause Rapid Evolutionary Change
by Stephen R. Palumbi
The first thing the author wants you to know is that evolution is a fact, not a theory. The second is this: evolution does not require eons and eons to make its effects manifest. By tinkering with genes and rewriting the laws of natural selection, we humans have lately been &qupt;accelerating the evolutionary game, especially among the species that live with us most intimately"--not our pets, that is to say, but the food we eat, the pests that share that food, and the diseases that visit us.
Palumbi concludes, ideas evolve, too, so that we can hope against hope to think our way back to more or less normal cycles of evolutionary change. Well-written and provocative, his book makes for a useful start.

$14.95


Feynman (1st of 11 entries): The Character of Physical Law
by Richard Feynman
Richard Feynman is universally admired by his fellow scientists. He was a brilliant, iconoclastic, influential physicist with a unique ability to bring his subject to life to the non-physicist.

$16.95


Feynman (2nd of 11 entries): Feynman's Lost Lecture : The Motion of Planets Around the Sun
by David and Judith Goodstein
This book/CD combo is a great historical presentation of the physics of Galileo and Newton's time. David and Judith Goodstein use fascinating historical notes, reminiscent of 'The Mechanical Universe', to prepare the reader for the Feynman lecture.

Feynman had spent his spare time proving Newton's law of elliptical planetary motion using only plane geometry. Originally delivered to an introductory physics class at Caltech in 1963, this 76-minute CD and book set contains everything the math-savvy listener needs to savor the pleasures of applied math. Caltech physicist David L. Goodstein and archivist Judith R. Goodstein found the notes and tape amid another professor's papers and set to work making sense of them; unfortunately, photographs of the blackboard drawings didn't survive. The book briefly covers their find and recovery work; then presents the proof as reconstructed--crucial reading if one is to follow the lecture. There's nothing easy about it, as Feynman acknowledges in the lecture:

He gives what he calls an elementary demonstration. "Elementary" means that very little is required to know ahead of time in order to understand it, except to have an infinite amount of intelligence. He means, instead, that he is strictly using geometrical methods to reach his destination, which explains why it was so difficult to reconstruct without his diagrams. His charming Brooklyn accent and good humor show through in this lecture, even if the material is quite a bit drier than his fans might expect. Still, those interested in adding a new dimension to their understanding of this brilliant scientist--and those with a deep interest in Newtonian physics--will find this book a rare and unexpected treat. Feynman's genius is obvious, but the best part of the CD is the Q-A portion at the end. Truly a genius, truly a great teacher. A wonderful book/cd combination. This book/CD combo is easily more advanced than Feynman's 'The Character of Physical Law' and so not recommended for the average non-technical reader. Lastly, be advised that the reader is strongly advised in the book to read the preparation for the lecture prior to listening to the lecture, else the reader will be thoroughly confused. For those with a more technical background, I recommend listening to the cd several times to see if you can follow, then go to the book. The proof will leap off the pages.

$19.95


Feynman (3rd of 11 entries): Richard Feynman : A Life in Science
by John R. Gribbin & Mary Gribbin
Richard Feynman was something of a rarity: a science superstar. Like another superstar who preceded him, Albert Einstein, Feynman's science was ahead of his time, but it was his qualities as a human being that caught the imaginations of ordinary people. A whole body of legend has grown up around the man--much of it promulgated by Feynman himself--and nearly 10 years after his death he remains a popular subject of memoirs, biographies, and even films. Respected science writers John and Mary Gribbin combine biography with popular science in this absorbing look at the great man's life and work. They do an exemplary job of explaining just why Feyman was such a giant among physicists. Quantum theory is the kind of subject that could give the average reader a raging headache, yet the Gribbins explain it so well that by the end of the book even the most non-scientific among us will be able to appreciate just what a singular contribution to our world this science superstar made.

$13.95


Feynman(4th of 11 entries): Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen Scientist
by Richard Feynman
In this series of lectures originally given in 1963, which remained unpublished during Richard Feynman's lifetime, the Nobel-winning physicist thinks aloud on several "meta"--questions of science. What is the nature of the tension between science and religious faith? Why does uncertainty play such a crucial role in the scientific imagination? Is this really a scientific age? Marked by Feynman's characteristic combination of rationality and humor, these lectures provide an intimate glimpse at the man behind the legend. "In case you are beginning to believe," he says at the start of his final lecture, "that some of the things I said before are true because I am a scientist and according to the brochure that you get I won some awards and so forth, instead of your looking at the ideas themselves and judging them directly...I will get rid of that tonight. I dedicate this lecture to showing what ridiculous conclusions and rare statements such a man as myself can make." Rare, perhaps. Irreverent, sure. But ridiculous? Not even close.

$14.00


Feynman (5th of 11 entries): No Ordinary Genius: The Illustrated Richard Feynman
by Richard Feynman and Christopher Sykes
This photo-album tribute presents a series of quick-but-intimate portraits through photographs of Feynman and friends and a selection of entertaining and revealing excerpts from interviews and conversations. The pictures and text are from the documentaries independent filmmaker Sykes made about Feynman's life and science. The supporting cast includes physicists Richard Davies, Freeman Dyson, David Goodstein, and John Archibald Wheeler as well as a couple of computer scientists, artists, musicians, and Feynman's children. The main events of Feynman's life: winning the Nobel Prize; working at Los Alamos; discoveries in superfluidity, diffusion, and radioactive decay; and investigation into the Challenger tragedy are all discussed, as is Feynman's gift for having fun

$21.95


Feynman (6th of 11 entries): Pleasure of Finding Things Out: The Best Short Works of Richard P. Feynman
by Jeffrey Robbins, Richard Feynman, & Freeman J. Dyson
Why do we do science? Beyond altruistic and self-aggrandizing motivations, many of our best scientists work long hours seeking the electric thrill that comes only from learning something that nobody knew before. This book is a collection of previously unpublished or difficult-to-find short works by maverick physicist Richard Feynman, and takes its title from his own answer. From TV interview transcripts to his acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize, we see his quick, sharp wit, his devotion to his work, and his unwillingness to bow to social pressure or convention. It's no wonder he was only grudgingly admired by the establishment during his lifetime--read his "Minority Report to the Space Shuttle Challenger Inquiry" to see him blowing off political considerations as impediments to finding the truth.

$15.00


Feynman (7th of 11 entries): QED
by Richard Feynman
"Physics Nobelist Feynman simply cannot help being original. In this quirky, fascinating book, he explains to laymen the quantum theory of light theory to which he made decisive contributions."--The New Yorker "Feynman's lectures must have been marvelous and they have been turned into an equally entrancing book, a vivid introduction to QED which is leavened and enlivened by his wit. Anyone with a curiosity about physics today should buy it, not only to get to grips with the deepest meaning of quantum theory but to possess a slice of history."

$16.95


Feynman (8th of 11 entries): Six Easy Pieces: Essentials of Physics Explained by Its Most Brilliant Teacher
by Richard Feynman, Paul Davies, Robert Leighton, & Matthew Sands
This is an excellent introduction to physics (or, rather, the basics thereof) and an essential resource to anyone thinking of getting involved in physics. In his characteristically lucid rhetoric, Richard Feynman teaches the beginning physicist how to think about things on his/her own - an essential in both the real world and science. He had the ability -and the patience- to try and explain things in different ways so he would make sure people understood him.

$13.95


Feynman (9th of 11 entries): Six Not-So-Easy Pieces : Einstein's Relativity, Symmetry, and Space-Time (Helix Books)
by Richard Feynman, Gerry Neugebauer, Roger Penrose
Six "easy" pieces were published in 1995. Now the publisher has dipped back into Feynman's three-volume to present these somewhat less accessible lectures. While the previous six-piece collection tackled various subjects, this volume deals only with Einstein's theory of relativity. Suitable for students and determined lay readers who want to learn from the master teacher, renowned not only for his scientific contributions, but for his wit, and the immediacy and clarity of his explanations.

$14.95


Feynman (10th of 11 entries): 'Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!' : Adventures of a Curious Character
by Edward Hutchings, Ralph Leighton, Richard Feynman, Albert Hibbs
A series of anecdotes shouldn't by rights add up to an autobiography, but that's just one of the many pieces of received wisdom that Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman (1918-88) cheerfully ignores in his engagingly eccentric book, a bestseller ever since its initial publication in 1985. Fiercely independent (read the chapter entitled "Judging Books by Their Covers"), intolerant of stupidity even when it comes packaged as high intellectualism (check out "Is Electricity Fire?"), unafraid to offend (see "You Just Ask Them?"), Feynman informs by entertaining. It's possible to enjoy this book simply as a bunch of hilarious yarns with the smart-alecky author as know-it-all hero. At some point, however, attentive readers realize that underneath all the merriment simmers a running commentary on what constitutes authentic knowledge: learning by understanding, not by rote; refusal to give up on seemingly insoluble problems; and total disrespect for fancy ideas that have no grounding in the real world. Feynman himself had all these qualities in spades, and they come through with vigor and verve in his no-bull prose. No wonder his students--and readers around the world--adored him. This book proves once again that it is possible to laugh out loud and scratch your head at the same time.

$15.95


Feynman (11th of 11 entries): Tuva or Bust! Richard Feynman's Last Journey
by Ralph Leighton
About Ralph Feynman's proposed last journey to Tannu Tuva , a remote mountainous area deep in Siberia. If you are a stamp collector, the name will be very familiar to you. Richard Feynman, brilliant physicist and inspirational teacher, wasn't much for coats and ties. He lived a life that the adjective "bohemian" doesn't begin to cover, scripting percussion scores for avant-garde ballet troupes, musing over life's imponderables, and delighting and annoying his many friends with odd-duck questions--all the while teaching generations of students at CalTech. Always adventurous, Feynman was also a careful planner, recounts his friend and fellow drummer Ralph Leighton in this affectionate memoir. When a chance remark happened to dislodge a long-dormant memory of a faraway Siberian land called Tannu-Tuva, Feynman and Leighton set about scheming to get there--a program that included learning the little-described Tuvan language, picking up the rudiments of throat singing, and reading the scattered, hard-to-find literature concerning a place that, in Feynman's fond view, was as close to paradise as the earth contained. It also involved corresponding with scholars in what was still the Soviet Union and wrangling with bureaucrats to secure the necessary papers--all for the sake of seeing a country that had to be interesting, Feynman insisted, just because its capital, Kyzyl, had such an odd spelling. These picaresque armchair adventures make up the bulk of Tuva or Bust, an unconventional mix of travelogue and scientific biography that's a pleasure to read at every turn. The book yields a memorable picture of Richard Feynman--who did not live to see Tuva, but whose memory is honored there today, thanks to Leighton's refusal to abandon their shared dream.

$13.95


Genome: The Autobiography of a Species in 23 chapters
by Matt Ridley
Before embarking on the discussion, Ridley presents a quick, clear guide to the few words and concepts the reader will need as he translates the unreadable into the readable. There is one chapter for each chromosome, focusing on its role in our development and adult life. Within that chapter, he discusses those genes that a layman is most interested in: those genes associated with cancer, intelligence, sex and more. He also explores the implications of genetic research and our quickly changing social attitudes towards this information. If you're interested in the future of the body, this book will be very informative.

$14.95


The Hunt for Zero Point: Inside the Classified World of Antigravity Technology
by Nick Cook
"Imagine the power, economic and military, that would fall into the hands of the person who figured out how to bypass the ordinary laws of physics, defy gravity, and travel near the speed of light. "The ideal craft for "electrogravitic reaction" would take the form of a disc, a design consideration seen in the shape of current stealth aircraft. It could just be, the author suggests, that what witnesses have taken to be flying saucers might instead be antigravity-aircraft prototypes. "And therein hangs a good part of this always interesting, if admittedly speculative, story, which, regardless of the truth of the matter (or, perhaps, antimatter), will appeal to techies and Trekkies alike."

$26.00


I Have Landed: The End of a Beginning in Natural History
by Stephen Jay Gould
Gould's name has become synonymous with evolutionary biology. He completed his 300th column for Natural History on the doubly significant 2001 millennium and centennial of his family's arrival at Ellis Island (thus the title, borrowed from his grandfather's journal entry that day). Gould is at the peak of his abilities in this latest collections of wonders.The book is a collection of 31 essays, from his Natural History column that explore the ambiguous relations of art, science and the natural world.

$16.00 (due 4/2003)


Jungles of Randomness: A Mathematical Safari
by Ivars Peterson
This book touches on subjects as diverse as molecular biology, engineering, and entomology, but it stays rooted in the field from which our understanding of complexity first arose: mathematics. A fascinating and underreported field, math is finally getting the mainstream attention.

$14.95


The Last Word 2: Newscientist
by Mick O'Hare and Spike Gerrell
This book is a compilation of scientific questions written in to the New Scientist Magazines "Last Word" page. Other readers then sent in their replies. The questions are not of a cosmic nature. For example: "Why do some people stick out there tongues while thinking", "Why are eggs egg-shaped", "Why doesn't cling wrap cling to a metal bowl as well as it does to plastic or glass bowls", "How can ants survive in a microwave". A fun read.

$14.95


The Librarian Who Measured the Earth
by Kathryn Lasky and Kevin Hawkes
For Grades 3-5.This picture-book biography depicts the life of Eratosthenes, an ancient Greek who eventually became the head of the famous library in Alexandria. His most notable achievement was a remarkably ingenious method for measuring the earth's girth. After determining the angles of shadows in two cities and the distance between them, he used geometry to calculate the circumference of the earth.

$17.95


The Lying Stones of Marrakech: Penultimate Reflections in Natural History
by Stephen Jay Gould
Gould was a renaissance man, a rarity today and his work reflects both the depth and breadth of his knowledge. The title essay refers to false fossils carved by Moroccans intent on making a few bucks from uninformed tourists. It discusses the case of Beringer's 18th-century fossil hoax, and ends with a plea for a stricter separation between commercial and scientific interests, reflecting the scope of his paleontological interests and thinking. Whether you're an old-school fan of Gould's writings or a newcomer to Whether he's detailing the founding moments of palentology and geology or excavating Alfred Russel Wallace's forays into predicting the future, you know that you're going to get the real story, impeccably told, straight from the primary sources. Gould's impeccable scholarship and the quality and originality of his thinking make his writings a joy to read.

$15.00


Math Gene: How Mathematical Thinking Evolved & Why Numbers Are Like Gossip
by Keith Devlin
Devlin argues that we all possess the ability to cope with mathematics--if only we recognize what's required. He examines the evidence that we all possess, if not literally a gene, then at least an inherent ability not just for arithmetic but for real mathematics: algebra, calculus, and the rest (please notice the separation of arithmetic from mathematics.) Devlin even puts forward a Darwinian explanation for the origin of this ability, based on the idea that being able to handle abstract ideas and relationships confers key evolutionary advantages. Mathematics merely involves a relatively high level of abstraction but one we can all cope with, if we work at it. "Doing mathematics is very much like running a marathon," writes Devlin. "It does not require any special talent, and Ôfinishing' is largely a matter of wanting to succeed." The book's plain common sense about this most misunderstood of subjects is inspirational. Thoroughly recommended for anyone seeking to rid their intellectual closet of the skeleton of mathematical "incompetence".

$17.50


Mystery of the Aleph
by Amir Aczel
He is the author of Fermat's Last Theorem. This book presents a learned survey of the regions where science and religion meet.

$15.00


Neutral Buoyancy: Adventures in a Liquid World
by Tim Ecott
Tim Ecott's love for diving comes through these pages in myriad ways. This book should be read by everyone interested in man's experience in the undersea world, from the beginning recreational diver to the experienced marine scientist. He traces the history, motivations, and science of our efforts to be free under the waves, from Aristotle's 4th century BC sponge divers, to the diving bells and barrels of three hundred years ago, through the development of scuba equipment in the 1900s and today's very modern technical and deep sea free divers. Be warned: if you are already a diver, the book will heighten the sense that you are wasting far too much precious time on dry land. For the rest, even if your underwater ventures are largely confined to the bath, this book will have you contemplating a trip to your local swimming pool at the very least. Truly inspirational.

$14.00


The New World of Mr Tompkins
by George Gamow, Russell Stannard, Michael Edwards
Through the eyes of Mr Tompkins, the mild-mannered bank clerk with the short attention span and vivid imagination, the unknowledgable reader is introduced to the concepts of modern physics. This is a new edition has Mr. Tompkins returning to embark on a set of adventures that explore the extreme edges of the universe from the smallest, the largest, the fastest, to the farthest. Just by following the experiences and dreams of Mr. Tompkins, readers can discover and come to know: Einstein's theory of relativity, bizarre effects near light-speed, the birth and death of the universe, black holes, quarks, space warps and antimatter, and the fuzzy world of the quantum. Readers, young and old alike, will be both entertained and informed.

$23.99


One on the Web
by Ginger Wadsworth & Jim Needham
With an informative text and captivating illustrations, the authors count from one to twenty as they introduce a score of fascinating creatures and the places they live. This book has been very popular with pre-school and kindergarten teachers.

$6.95


Paradigms Lost: Tackling the Unanswered Mystery of Modern Science
by John L. Casti
A mathematician presents the great problems of modern science with a unique twist--in the form of a jury trial. Casti argues for the prosecution and the defense, and then renders a verdict on the Origin of Life, Sociobiology, Language Acquisition and more.

$15.95


Paradigms Regained: A Further Exploration of the Mysteries of Modern Science
by John L. Casti
Here John Casti reexamines the six big questions he looked at in his 1989 book, Paradigms Lost.: Did life begin naturally and on Earth? Is human behavior genetically determined? Is there a language organ in the human brain? Can computers think? Can we talk to ET? Is there a Real World? He then takes the same questions to an appeals court, summarizes the evidence from the "trial" and introduces new evidence from the intervening decade.

$15.95


Periodic Kingdom
by P.W.Atkins
This is not an academic book. It is a popular science book intended to present the complicated subject of chemistry in an accessible way. In other words, the unreadable has become readable. Enjoy!

$14.95


Physics for Poets
by Robert H. March
This updated edition includes updated discussions of Chaos, Relativity, Quantum Theory, and Cosmology. It is a chronological review of Physics from its inception by the Greeks to the current edge of particle physics. If they've made you hate physics in high school, read this book and you'll understand how utterly fascinating it really is.

$21.95


Powers of Ten
by Morrison, etc.
42 consecutive scenes, each at a different power of 10 level of magnification. You travel from the vast to the miniscule. This book contains the proof that there is life in outer space.

$22.95


Rocks of Ages: Science and Religion
by Stephen Jay Gould The two Rocks of Ages are science and religion. This book addresses the debate of evolution versus creation in education. To clarify: Science tells you how to build an atom bomb Religion addresses the question of whether you should use it. Religion grapples with the serious moral questions and offers wisdom about how to live your life. Gould, an agnostic, clearly concedes religion its domain.

$12.95


Science Class You Wish You Had: The Seven Greatest Scientific Discoveries in History and the People Who Made Them
by Brody & Brody
The Brodys explain the seven greatest scientific discoveries conceptually, so the reader does not have to know math or detailed chemistry. The seven greatest scientific discoveries in history are: (1)Gravity and the basic laws of physics; (2)The structure of the atom; (3)Relativity; (4)The Big Bang; (5)Evolution; (6)The cell; and (7)The structure of the DNA molecule. These are seven findings so profound that almost everything else that humankind understands in science is based on them.

$19.95


Science in a Nanosecond: Illustrated Answers to 100 Basic Science Questions
by James A. Haught & Gary T. Hahn
This book is a solid general reference on the physics of sound (music in particular) from instrument through air to the ear. It predates cognitive science.

$19.98


Science in Ancient China
Great for anyone 10 and up. A superb and very enlightening series of 8 books chronicling the scientific achievements of previous cultures. When you finish reading them, you realize how much knowledge has been gained and lost, and gained and lost. The series of 8 reveals the large debt owed by modern scientists to the healers, mathematicians, stargazers, explorers, and thinkers of the ancient world. Certainly they should be in every school library.

$8.95


Science in Ancient Egypt
Great for anyone 10 and up. A superb and very enlightening series of 8 books chronicling the scientific achievements of previous cultures. When you finish reading them, you realize how much knowledge has been gained and lost, and gained and lost. The series of 8 reveals the large debt owed by modern scientists to the healers, mathematicians, stargazers, explorers, and thinkers of the ancient world. Certainly they should be in every school library.

$8.95


Science in Ancient Greece
Great for anyone 10 and up. A superb and very enlightening series of 8 books chronicling the scientific achievements of previous cultures. When you finish reading them, you realize how much knowledge has been gained and lost, and gained and lost. The series of 8 reveals the large debt owed by modern scientists to the healers, mathematicians, stargazers, explorers, and thinkers of the ancient world. Certainly they should be in every school library.

$8.95


Science in Ancient Islamic Culture
Great for anyone 10 and up. A superb and very enlightening series of 8 books chronicling the scientific achievements of previous cultures. When you finish reading them, you realize how much knowledge has been gained and lost, and gained and lost. The series of 8 reveals the large debt owed by modern scientists to the healers, mathematicians, stargazers, explorers, and thinkers of the ancient world. Certainly they should be in every school library.

$8.95


Science in Mesopotamia
Great for anyone 10 and up. A superb and very enlightening series of 8 books chronicling the scientific achievements of previous cultures. When you finish reading them, you realize how much knowledge has been gained and lost, and gained and lost. The series of 8 reveals the large debt owed by modern scientists to the healers, mathematicians, stargazers, explorers, and thinkers of the ancient world. Certainly they should be in every school library.

$8.95


Science in Ancient Rome
Great for anyone 10 and up. A superb and very enlightening series of 8 books chronicling the scientific achievements of previous cultures. When you finish reading them, you realize how much knowledge has been gained and lost, and gained and lost. The series of 8 reveals the large debt owed by modern scientists to the healers, mathematicians, stargazers, explorers, and thinkers of the ancient world. Certainly they should be in every school library.

$8.95


Science: Good Bad & Bogus
by Martin Gardner
Paper reprint of the 1981 essay collection which inflicts hundreds of punctures to pseudoscientific pretensions.

$26.95


Science of Aliens
by Clifford Pickover
Out-of-this-world speculation on extraterrestrial life that will fascinate fans of Star Trek, The X-Files, and sci-fi of all kinds. The author poses the question, "Can creatures dream of things beyond their sensory capacity?" He thinks humans can--to some extent, at least. To stimulate the reader's imagination, Pickover focuses on the characteristics of the earth's creatures--their appearance, their senses, their environments, their sexual behaviors--and argues that this diversity pales in comparison to the far wider possibilities in alien worlds. SF fans will enjoy this entertaining and thought-provoking book.

$15.00


Science on a Shoestring
by Herb Strongin
For grades K-8. Herb Strongin is lightyears ahead of other science educators. He has recognized that there are a few big ideas in science, and if students organize their investigations around topics of interest that are sequenced to support those big ideas, then science content understanding will emerge from doing science. The activities in this book are simple, at times unusual, and they really work! Elementary teachers with little content background in science will find these activities to be understandable and doable. Experienced teachers will find lots of suggestions for how to take their kids deeper into subjects. The author's implicit philosophy is: get'em while they're curious!

$23.50


Super Symmetry: Unveiling the Ultimate Laws of Nature
by Gordon Kane and Edward Witten
Call it a preview of coming attractions. The physical theory called "supersymmetry" is as yet unproven, but its proof will unite the four fundamental forces of nature--electromagnetism, gravity, and the strong and weak nuclear forces--and lead to the so-called Grand Unified Theory that physicists have long quested after. The theory underlying supersymmetry posits that every particle has a "superpartner" (a quark has a "squark," an electron a "selectron," and so on), whose existence can be adduced by observable behavior.The experimental proof required to validate supersymmetry will soon be available, when reconfigured particle accelerators at the Fermilab in Illinois and CERN in Switzerland come on line.

$17.00


Superstrings: A Theory of Everything?
by P.C.Davies & J.Brown
A clear concise introduction to string theory including transcripts with all the most important scientists involved in the development of the theory.

$26.99


Synchronicity
by F. David Peat
The bridge between matter and mind.

$16.00


There Are No Electrons
by Kenn Amdahl
This book definitely is a "readable book on an unreadable subject". It is a must-read for anyone interested in electricity, engineering, physics, computers, or anything of the sort! It is like reading a script for a really good episode of "X-Files", but the whole time you are learning about electronics. It's not a text book, but it explains electricity in a way that even if you have a short attention span, you will learn and be very entertained while reading it.

$12.95


Ubiquity: Why Catastrophes Happen
by Mark Buchanan
At the heart of the story, lies the discovery that networks of things of all kind - atoms, molecules, species, people, and even idea - have a marked tendency to organize themselves along similar lines. On the basis of this insight, scientists are finally beginning to fathom what lies behind tumultuous events of all sorts, and to see patterns at work where they have never seen them before. Read on.

$14.00


Universal Foam: From Cappuccino to the Cosmos
by Sidney Perkowitz
Suggesting that the universe resembles a piping-hot cup of milk-laced coffee, the author describes it as a mixture of solids, liquids, and gases, along with something that partakes of all these states of matter but is different from them as well, namely, foam. Foam, he writes, is a surprisingly intricate formation that has impacted astronomy, biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics. The foam of the sea, for instance, has extraordinarily complex properties that influence, among other things, global weather systems and if harnessed, may one day yield that magical source of inexhaustibly renewable, inexpensive energy that scientists have long sought. Foam permeates and underlies the cosmos, from subatomic bits of "quantum foam" that "stir up the fundamental shape of the world" to the air-riddled magma that bubbles below planetary surfaces and the foamlike cancellous bones that bear the weight of so many animals, humans included. "You've heard of chaos theory, of butterflies that flap their wings and produce hurricanes. Perkowitz provides an endlessly entertaining introduction to foam theory, a book of popular science to enjoy with an appropriately frothy beverage close at hand."

$12.00


The Universe and the Teacup: The Mathematics of Truth and Beauty
by K. C. Cole
Mathematics, Cole explains, enables us to "translate the complexity of the world into manageable patterns," whether we're trying to comprehend the risks of smoking or the usefulness of DNA matches in criminal investigations. Cole also looks at how mathematical principles apply in unexpected fields. One chapter, for example, vindicates the theories on voting rights that cost Lani Guinier her Justice Department nomination in 1993. Without relying on a single equation, Cole's gently humorous prose helps make mathematics non-threatening to laypeople, enabling them to better understand the world in which they live.

$15.00


The Universe in a Nutshell
by Stephen Hawking
"While Hawking offers genuinely accessible context for such complexities as string theory and the nature of time, it's when he must translate equations to sentences that the limits of language get in the way. But Hawking has simplified the origin of the universe, the nature of space and time, and what holds it all together to an unprecedented degree, inviting nonscientists to share his obvious awe and love of the unseen forces that shape it all." Yes, it's difficult reading, but it's worth it. Hawking is one of the great geniuses of our time, a man whose life has been devoted to thinking in the abstract about the universe. With his help, and lots of pictures we can seek to understand a bit more of the cosmos.

$35.00


What Counts: How Every Brain is Hardwired for Math
by Brian Butterworth
The author combines his unique expertise in cognitive neuroscience with his broad knowledge of mathematics to offer a completely original picture of how our brains do math. This is the first book to provide a complete picture of how and why our mathematical brain evolved and what this new knowledge means to our everyday lives.

$26.00


When Things Start To Think
by Neil A. Gershenfeld
Neil Gershenfeld, director of MIT's Media Lab, joins the ranks of techno-prognosticators with this book, and his focus is on how the future of computing will fit into our physical realities. Gershenfeld explores such science fictional ideas as wearable computers, nanotech circuitry implants, as well as such concerns as emotions, money, and civil rights in the new age of artificial intelligence. Gershenfeld provides a historical overview of the development of computers and extrapolates a world in which we will be forced to deal with things that think all the time. This can't help but reshape our society in ways we must try to imagine. You may be surprised at how far along this road we are--Gershenfeld is in exactly the right place to tell this story, and it's a whole lot of fun (and a little scary) to ride this wave with him.

$14.00


Why Things Are and Why Things Aren't: The Answers to Life's Greatest Mysteries
by Joel Achenbach
This book is for the insatiably curious. It is funny and full of accurate scientific information. It provides answers to questions you didn't even realize you had. The author is obviously an incredibly talented writer who is having a good time with the subject matter. A great little book and surprisingly profound! Some sample questions:
Did you know that a diet coke can will float in water but not a normal coke can?
Why is the Oval Office oval?
Why is it so darn hard to lose weight?
Why did Napoleon keep his hand tucked in his vest?
Since we're mostly made of water, why don't we slosh around more?
Why are people so obsessed with talking, thinking, and hearing about sex?
Why is the interior of the Earth still hot after 4.6 billion years of letting off steam (and lava)? Why doesn't this thing ever cool off?
I think you will become a fan of Mr. Achenbach as I have.

$11.00


Wind
by Jan DeBlieu
How the flow of air has shaped life, myth, and the land.

$18.00