Search
Home
Order

 

For The Mathematically Curious About:
Art & Architecture
Astronomy & the Cosmos
Biographies
Business
Codes
Education Gr. K-6
Education Gr. 7+
History: Math & Science
Mathematical Hands On Projects
Mathematical Posters
Mathematical Principles
Mathematical Thinking
Mathematical Toys
Music
Numbers
Practical Applications
Probability
Puzzles and Games
Science
Science (Math) Fiction
Sports
Statistics
Time & Time Travel
Customer Service
About Us

 

Mathematical Thinking
 

The Computer and the Brain (Mrs. Hepsa Ely Silliman Memorial Lectures
by John Von Neumann
John von Neumann, genius, mathematician, was the inventor of the nearly ubiquitous computer architecture that bears his name.
This short book, which was written originally for Yale's Silliman lectures, but published posthumously, summarizes his views on machine and biological intelligence with unprecedented clarity and precision. His understanding of neuroscience was that of a brilliant and strongly motivated amateur at the end of the 1950s, good enough to take on the problem, but by no means matching his comprehension of the machines to which he had devoted much of his professional life.
Prominent neuroscientific thinkers Paul M. Churchland and Patricia S. Churchland provide a brief foreword to this second edition, placing the author's thinking in context and grounding the reader in the scientific milieu that gave rise to The Computer and the Brain. Although his computer architecture slowly is growing obsolete, von Neumann has given us a more lasting legacy in his thinking about thinking.

$9.95


Excursions in Number Theory
by C. Stanley Ogilvie
This text does not require an extensive background in math or fluency in the language of proofs. It is, as the title suggests, a delightful excursion through number theory that will ignite your interest in the subject and move you to further study. The author's annotations are helpful. At many points in the text, the author prompts the reader to pursue a question on his/her own, rather than walk through a full proof or explanation. This may seem abrupt, but it keeps the text focused and leaves the reader wanting to know more about number theory. The author has condensed a difficult subject into everyday language without condescending to the reader.

$7.95


Five Golden Rules
by John L. Casti
General theories of twentieth century mathematics and why they matter.

$18.95


Five More Golden Rules: Knots, Codes, Chaos, and Other Great Theories of 20th Century Mathematics
by John L. Casti
This follow-up explores the intricacies of knot theory, functional analysis, control theory, chaotic systems, and information theory. Science author John Casti offers an exposition of the origins of five additional interesting modern mathematical theories, with insight on how these discoveries have shaped our lives. As with the first volume, no more background is required than high school math classes.

$16.95


Knots: Mathematics With a Twist
by Alexei Sossinsky
Ornaments and icons, symbols of complexity or evil, aesthetically appealing and endlessly useful in everyday ways, knots are also the object of mathematical theory used to unravel ideas about the topological nature of space. In recent years, knot theory has been brought to bear on the study of equations describing the weather systems, mathematical models used in physics, and even, with the realization that DNA sometimes is knotted molecular biology. Sossinsky is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Moscow.

$24.95


Mathematics: The Loss of Certainty
by Morris Kline
This work stresses the illogical manner in which mathematics has developed i.e. the question of applied mathematics versus "pure" mathematics. The author shows a great insight concerning the history of the development of mathematics, recounting the problems that different mathematicians had throughout history, revealing the way some pretended to solve a problem, their logical and illogical reasons for doing so. This is definitely a great book for math fans.

$16.95


Mathematical Thought from Ancient to Modern Times (vol. 1 of 3)
by Morris Kline
The major creations and developments in mathematics from the beginnings in Babylonia and Egypt through the first few decades of the twentieth century are presented with clarity and precision in this comprehensive scholarly historical study. If it's a major mathematical development before 1930, Kline will have it somewhere in these 3-volumes.

$19.95 each.


Mathematical Thought from Ancient to Modern Times (vol. 2 of 3)
by Morris Kline
The major creations and developments in mathematics from the beginnings in Babylonia and Egypt through the first few decades of the twentieth century are presented with clarity and precision in this comprehensive scholarly historical study.
If it's a major mathematical development before 1930, Kline will have it somewhere in these 3-volumes.

$19.95 each.


Mathematical Thought from Ancient to Modern Times (vol. 3 of 3)
by Morris Kline
The major creations and developments in mathematics from the beginnings in Babylonia and Egypt through the first few decades of the twentieth century are presented with clarity and precision in this comprehensive scholarly historical study. If it's a major mathematical development before 1930, Kline will have it somewhere in these 3-volumes.

$19.95 each.


The Millennium Problems: The Seven Greatest Unsolved Mathematical Puzzles of Our Time
by Keith J. Devlin
In 2000, the Clay Foundation of Cambridge, Massachusetts, announced a historic competition: whoever could solve any of seven extraordinarily difficult mathematical problems, and have the solution acknowledged as correct by the experts, would receive $1 million in prize money. There was some precedent for doing this: in 1900 David Hilbert, one of the greatest mathematicians of his day, proposed twenty-three problems, now known as the Hilbert Problems, that set much of the agenda for mathematics in the twentieth century. The Millennium Problems are likely to acquire similar stature, and their solution (or lack of one) is likely to play a strong role in determining the course of mathematics in the current century. Keith Devlin, renowned expositor of mathematics, tells here what the seven problems are, how they came about, and what they mean for math and science. He has done an excellent job of providing a historical and mathematical background for each of these problems for the laymen, and in process, reveals how the solutions to these problems would bring an exponential leap for the human knowledge as a whole.

$26.00


Nine Crazy Ideas in Science: A Few Might Even Be True
by Robert Ehrlich
The author points out that many ideas in science seemed crazy at one time but are now reported as being settled ... as in the case of plate tectonics, which grew out of an earlier "crazy" theory of continental drift. Some of the crazy ideas relate to our lives: AIDS, gun control, sun and radiation exposure. Others are further out there, such as the double sun theory and the possibility of time travel. For each he examines who the idea's proponents are and what their agendas might be. He looks for internal consistency, misapplication of statistics, how open the proponents are with their data and methods, and more. The book makes several eccentric scientific theories accessible to general readers and, more important, it teaches methods of evaluating new ideas so we can decide for ourselves whether or not they make sense.

$16.95


Proofs from the Book
by Martin Aigner, Gunter M. Ziegler
The heroes of this book are the perfect proofs: brilliant ideas, clever connections and wonderful observations that bring new insight and surprising perspectives to basic and challenging problems from Number Theory, Geometry, Analysis, Combinatorics, and Graph Theory. Thirty beautiful examples are presented here. The result is a book which will be fun for everybody with an interest in mathematics, requiring only a very modest undergraduate mathematical background.

$32.95


Where Mathematics Comes From: How the Embodied Mind Brings Mathematics into Being
by George Lakoff, Rafael E. Nunez
Those willing to brave its rigors will find this book rewarding and thought-provoking. The book deals with the concept of infinity and tries to explain how our limited experience in a seemingly finite world can lead to such a crazy idea. The authors know their math and their cognitive theory. While those who want their abstractions to reflect the real world will have trouble reading, most readers will take to the new conception of mathematical thinking.

$20.00